【Kagami Mochi】鏡餅

 昨日、鏡餅を床の間に飾りました。

「鏡餅」という名前は、昔の鏡に似ているところから呼ばれています。昔の鏡

は、青銅製で神事に用いられ、日本神話にある「三種の神器」のひとつです。現

在でも、天皇に引き継がれています。

 この鏡餅は、平安時代に始まって、源氏物語にも出てきます。現在の形になっ

て、床の間に飾られるようになったのは、室町時代からだそうです。

 「床の間」とは、日本の住宅のうち格式を高めた客間などに設けられた、一定

の空間をいいます。

 お餅は、昔は黒米を食べていたので、黒かったそうですが、明治時代頃には、

白くなったようです。また、形が丸いのは、心臓をかたどったと言われていま

す。現在は、本物のお餅は、カビたり、ひびが入ったりするので、あまり使われ

ていません。プラスチックのものの中に、小さなお餅がたくさん入っています。

そのお餅は、年が明けて、1月11日に「鏡開き」という行事で食べます。

Yesterday, we put up the Kagami-mochi (a kind of rice cake) in the

tokonoma (alcove in English).

The name of “Kagami-mochi” comes from its resemblance to an old-

fashioned mirror. The old mirror, made of bronze, was used for rituals and

is one of the “three sacred treasures” of Japanese mythology.

Even today, it is passed on to the Emperor.

This Kagami-mochi originated in the Heian period (794-1185) and can be

found in the Tale of Genji.

In its present form, it has been displayed in the tokonoma since the

Muromachi period (1336-1573).

The tokonoma is a fixed space in a Japanese house, usually in a formal

drawing-room.

The rice cakes used to be black because they used to eat black rice, but

they became white around the Meiji era. It is also said that the round shape

is a reference to the heart. Nowadays, real rice cakes are not used very

often because they get mouldy and cracked.

A lot of small rice cakes in a plastic Kagami-mochi.

The rice cakes are eaten at the beginning of the year, on 11 January, in an

event called Kagami-biraki.

コメントを残す

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です